A plan for the future

Everyone knows that the world of work is changing. Technology is developing at a pace faster than ever before, and many of the jobs and roles we know today simply won’t exist in a decade.

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Wellington Conference Presentations

On Friday 26 August 2016 we held a Wellington Future of Work Seminar with a range of speakers. 

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Lessons from the Future of Work Commission: Building Wealth from the Ground Up

Grant Robertson

Future of Work Commission Seminar

Friday 26 August 2016

Wellington

Good morning, and thank you for attending today’s Future of Work Seminar here in Wellington. I want to particularly acknowledge Beth Houston who has spent many hours pulling together the programme for today’s event, and to Olivier and the staff here at the CQ Hotel for their forbearance. I also want to acknowledge all of the presenters who you will hear from today. They have an incredible range of backgrounds and interests and are of course busy people so I thank them very much indeed for spending some time with us today. As we have tried to do at every stage of the Future of Work Commission programme you will hear a range of views today. The easy thing for a political party to do is simply work out what we think the policy path forward is, and go and get people who already agree with us to support that view. We have attempted to turn that approach on its head in this project, by opening ourselves up to a range of viewpoints and ideas on what the future of work is and what we can do to shape it. 

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Ideas from our Future of Work Conference

The Future of Work Commission’s recent conference on the issues facing New Zealand from the changing nature of work. raised a wide range of issues to address and opportunities to grasp. A summary of the key ideas and solutions from that conference are below.

Trends

In my opening address to the conference I pointed out the McKinsey’s study that suggests we are experiencing technological change at a rate thirty times that of the industrial revolution.  I also launched our Ten Big Ideas document which represents a snapshot of our consultation in the first year of the Future of Work Commission’s programme (see below.)

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Future of Work and the Ten Big Ideas

You might have thought from some of the media commentary that the only thing being considered by Labour’s Future of Work Commission was a Universal Basic Income, such is the level of excitement created by our consideration of that idea.

But it is much more than that. The Commission is looking at a comprehensive plan for how we ensure there are decent work opportunities and secure income for New Zealanders in a world that is changing faster than we have ever seen before.

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The 10 Big Ideas

To download the 10 Big Ideas discussion document, click here (PDF, 1.04MB).

Labour’s Future of Work Commission consultation has been developed into Ten Big Ideas that will help shape Labour’s policy development, says Labour’s Future of Work Commission Chair Grant Robertson.

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Background Paper: A Universal Basic Income for New Zealand

The Future of Work Commission today released the second of its background papers on a Universal Basic Income. The paper A Universal Basic Income for New Zealand is a joint paper between writer and researcher Max Harris and postgraduate student Sebastiaan Bierema.

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Göran Roos on Security of Income and Work

The Future of Work Commission has received a number of excellent submissions on its issue paper and will be looking to put out a summary of these later in the year. However some submissions are worth sharing in their entirety and one of these is Göran Roos’ submission on behalf of the E Tū union. While this submission does not necessarily reflect the views of the Commission it is an excellent analysis of some of the challenges and opportunities facing New Zealand.

The analysis looks at the main transformational technologies likely to affect New Zealand: Information and Communication Technologies including Big Data &; Big Data Analytics, Artificial Intelligence as well as internet-of- things; Advanced Manufacturing Technologies including additive manufacturing and industrial robotics; Industrial Biotechnology with specific focus on microbial consortia engineering and synthetic biology; Photonics; Advanced Materials; Nanotechnology; Micro- and Nano-electronics.

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Programme for Future of Work conference

Labour’s Future of Work Commission Chair Grant Robertson will host the Future of Work Conference at AUT University on 23 and 24 March.

The keynote speakers for the 23rd are former Secretary of Labour for the Clinton Administration Robert Reich and author of The Precariat Guy Standing. 

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Education key priority for Pasifika in Future of Work

Education, re-training and entrepreneurship must be key priorities if Pacific Islanders are to be winners in the changing nature of work Labour’s latest Future of Work paper has found.

“The Pasifika and Future of Work paper released today shows Pacific people have real opportunities but also challenges in the coming years as the nature of work changes,” says Grant Robertson, Chair of Labour’s Future of Work Commission.

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